Statements

“I am excited about being an Intern with the Latino History Project. I like the truth. That is why this project is so important to me. We rarely hear the stories of Latino people, and they are lost when they are not retold.” Veronica Lamas, an Intern with the project and a recent Honors graduate of the University of Colorado at Boulder

"Inclusive history is important because it allows people to know and value all of their community members and understand their contributions. The Latino History Project has an additional unique benefit because it provides Latino youth the opportunity to personally hear from their elders about the challenges, joys, resilience and success they have experienced in Boulder County. This next generation of leaders will be nurtured by the stories they gather." Carmen Ramirez, Latino Taskforce Board President , Community Activities

"The Latino History Project is worthwhile because it teaches you the struggles and the good things about Latinos. I decided to join the project to gain experience and learn more about history. It let me get a connection with the people we interviewed and makes me appreciate my own life more." Salvador Serrano, Intern with the project and a student at Skyline High School, Longmont

"American history has in the main excluded the contributions of people of color. The Latino history project provides a glimpse of what it took to succeed in an Anglo world and what we lost in that process. It provides the opportunity to share our experience with the larger community but most of all it provides the avenue to bring us closer to the immigrant Latino population. Their struggles are the same issues that our parents and grandparents had to overcome and issues which we as a Latino community are still struggling with today." Phil Hernandez, interviewer for the project and narrator for film showing places that have been important to Latinos in Boulder

"I am a Mexican-born young woman with DACA status in the US. I grew up listening to the stories of other people. When I heard about the project I made up my mind to be a part of it. This is all about the stories that were never told or that were forgotten. It tells the truth; the struggles and the victories of Latinos of the past and present in Boulder County. Being part of this project that tells the untold stories is a blessing." Deisy deLuna, an Intern with the project and a student at Front Range Community College, Longmont

"The Latino History Project helps people learn about what Latinos experienced in Boulder County in the past. It shows how much has changed, but it also opened my eyes and made me realize there is still a lot more to be done." Dalia Sanchez, Intern with the project and a student at Front Range Community College, Longmont

"I am proud of who I am. I am proud of my heritage. I joined the Boulder County History Project to help Latino stories be heard because we are a part of America's history. Latino history needs to be known as much as any other race that is part of the U.S." Irle Hernandez, part-time Intern with the project and a student at Centaurus High School, Lafayette

"It has always been interesting and exciting hearing and learning about American History – our country's stories and heroes are fascinating and awe inspiring. I have always felt it lacking though. I have always felt left out. Where were my people's stories - where were my people's heroes? Hispanics had to have contributed more than city names. I was very excited when approached about this project. It indicates a step in the right direction to create an all-inclusive, more comprehensive history of America." J. Jaime Rios, interviewer for the project

"It was a great experience, and a learning one, too, to drive around Boulder with Phil Hernandez and Ana Gonzalez Dorta, our film-making Intern. Phil and I described places that have been important to Latinos while Ana videographed them. The potential of this project is unique and honorable." Linda Arroyo-Holstrom, narrator for film showing places that have been important to Latinos in Boulder

"I think that the Latino History Project is a great way to bring awareness to the community of the impact that Latinos have had in and around Boulder, Longmont, and Lafayette. By being part of the project, I have made my voice and the voices of all Latinos heard." Emmanuel Melgoza, Intern with the project and a student at the University of Colorado at Boulder

"I was thrilled to participate in the Latino History Project to learn about the history of Latinos in Boulder County and to show the world that we Latinos have lived here and contributed to this place. I believe that the project is so significant because it has helped us put together part of our history for Coloradans and the world to see." Ana Gonzalez Dorta, film-making Intern for the project and a student at the University of Colorado at Denver

"Being involved with the project has been an incredible opportunity for me to learn the stories and meet members of Boulder's Latino community. Through the project I have gained a much deeper appreciation of the struggles of mi gente in northern Colorado." Jason Romero, Jr., Intern with the project and a recent Honors graduate from the University of Colorado at Boulder

"This project is so important for the community at large, to be aware of all the contributions made by Latinos and have the Latino population viewed in a positive way. The project's website and the book that will be written will be something concrete to give Latinos a better self-value and self-esteem. It is especially important for our young Latinos to have some knowledge of their history in the past and present, to enable them to take pride in their Latino culture, language, values, lifestyle, religion. That will help them see education as a vehicle to a better future, and they can pass this information on to the next generations." Esther Blazón, interviewer for the project and narrator of film showing places that have been important to Latinos in Longmont.

“With a few small exceptions, Latinos are virtually invisible in the standard histories of Boulder County. For me, it’s a moral as well as a historical issue. What we know about the past should include everybody.” Marjorie McIntosh, coordinator for the Boulder County Latino History Project and Distinguished Professor of History Emerita, University of Colorado at Boulder